Month: September 2016

Negotiating EHR Service Contracts

Adopting a new EHR (electronic health record) system is a complicated and time-consuming process. Understandably, most providers working through that process focus on the technical and logistical details. But the legal details are important, too. We discussed in a prior post the importance of negotiating contracts, and EHR service contracts are no exception. If the EHR doesn’t work as intended, or if the EHR vendor doesn’t do what it promised, or if a breach affects your patients’ records, the first place you’ll need to look for a remedy is the contract. Recognizing the importance of EHR contracts – and...

Read More

JLG is All About the Tech

The JLG team is in Chicago at the Clio Cloud Conference this week. Clio is the cloud-based system we use for billing and managing our client contacts. The conference is focused on the use of cutting-edge technology in the legal industry and is attended by 700 tech-happy lawyers. JLG loves using (good) technology to help us work more efficiently and make your client experience more seamless. We’ll be returning home with plenty of new ideas for how to put technology to work for our firm and for...

Read More

OSHA Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence

We usually think of OSHA in the context of injuries caused by dangerous equipment or machinery. But sometimes workplace injuries are caused by people. In the healthcare sector, the problem is particularly acute. A Bureau of Labor Statistics and National Crime Victimization Survey that found that 70-74% of reported workplace assaults between 2011 and 2013 were in health care and social service settings. A significant workplace hazard for healthcare workers is not fellow employees, but the patients. In April 2015, OSHA issued new guidelines for preventing workplace violence for healthcare and social service workers. Since then, OSHA has been...

Read More

Legislative News Brief: Right to Try Legislation

Last week, we featured an article about orphan drugs and the law that helped make drugs for rare conditions more widely available to patients. But in the on-going battle to get patients the treatments they need, now there’s a new frontier: access to drugs that haven’t been approved yet. Earlier this year, a bill known as the “Right to Try Act” was introduced in the Senate. Following the lead of similar laws that have been introduced or passed in more than thirty states, the bill would allow patients to use unapproved medical products if the patients have been diagnosed...

Read More

Article of the Week: Orphan Drugs as Cash Cow

Once upon a time, the pharmaceutical industry all but ignored potential treatments for rare diseases, which by virtue of their small patient numbers offered little promise of a good financial return. That changed with the 1983 passage of the Orphan Drug Act, which gave pharmaceutical companies financial incentives to develop drugs for rare, or “orphan,” diseases. The Act was, arguably, quite successful: more than 400 orphan drugs have been approved since, and hundreds of applications are submitted each year. But now, as the cost of those orphan drugs skyrockets, there’s a debate over whether the Act has backfired. The...

Read More